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 Post subject: Critique: The Innovative Saikei
PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 4:57 pm 
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Location: Vero Beach, FL
This thread is for discussion of Charles Bevan's critique, "The Innovative Saikei."
http://www.artofbonsai.org/articles/saikeicritique.php


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2005 2:50 pm 
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Location: Philadelphia, PA, USA
Charles,
Good topic for posting here. I agree that Jim has done something innovative. I also agree with your suggestions that changing the viewing angle would lead to better perspective and scale throughout the composition.

You probably have a copy of Robert Stevens' new book. He shows two creations that consist of a large horizontal tree trunk with many trees growing vertically from it - sort of a root-connected style. However, as Jim has done, Robert uses the horizontal trunk to represent a mountain ridge or a large stone and does not bury it in the soil as in a true root-connected tree. So yes, I think one can use other material to create an effective composition.
Regards,
Walter


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:30 pm 
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Location: Vero Beach, FL
Walter Scott wrote:
Charles,
Good topic for posting here. I agree that Jim has done something innovative. I also agree with your suggestions that changing the viewing angle would lead to better perspective and scale throughout the composition.
You probably have a copy of Robert Stevens' new book. He shows two creations that consist of a large horizontal tree trunk with many trees growing vertically from it - sort of a root-connected style. However, as Jim has done, Robert uses the horizontal trunk to represent a mountain ridge or a large stone and does not bury it in the soil as in a true root-connected tree. So yes, I think one can use other material to create an effective composition.
Regards,
Walter

Walter,
Thank you for your input. I managed to pick up a copy of Robert Steven's book while I was in Washington D.C. Your mention of Robert's two plantings which utilized a horizontal trunk not meant to represent a tree had me searching for the pages that showed these plantings. From what I can see, you were referring to the trees on pages 112 and 114 as well as possibly page 150. I would like you to notice on page 112 in his simulation, he has mounded the moss on the right side of the composition creating a hole in the composition. In a two dimensional image the negative space from this hole appears to be representative of a lake. However, I am not sure if it would appear that way in three dimensions. If it would, tge effect would be strikingly similar to the lake created in VanLandingham's cypress. The planting on page 150 might create the same effect, however, I doubt there is enough depth in the holes for this to be possible in three dimensions. In my opinion, the planting on page 150 was designed to display an anthropomorphic figure of a grotesque face. One would have to ask Robert to know for sure, though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:35 pm 
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Location: Vero Beach, FL
Just to remind everyone of the "artistic limitations" of bonsai, a couple of days after this article was submitted, the deadwood near the base of this tree completely rotted away, changing the entire story of the tree. Jim has mentioned in the past that he has never been satisfied with the story told by this tree. After I did my best to explain the reasoning behind the planting, it seemed he was finally satisfied, and then the bottom piece rotted away. I guess it is back to the 'drawing boards'.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:03 pm 
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Location: Basel, Switzerland
Charles Bevan wrote:
Just to remind everyone of the "artistic limitations" of bonsai, a couple of days after this article was submitted, the deadwood near the base of this tree completely rotted away, [?] I guess it is back to the 'drawing boards'.

It could as well be the beginning of further experiments. I think about this piece of sprucewood I keep outside since three years. It was simply being "cooked" in lineseed-oil for some hours and now seems to resist any weather (this german who "plastinates" bodies gave the initial idea to it). It would probably not be a good idea to do that with living parts, but still, we take so many limitations for given. When I find a suitable trunk some day, I will try. Should be possible to create a ground that provides humidity to the roots and at the same time keeps the rest dry. Ideas don't die.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 12:09 pm 
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Location: Valencia, Spain.
The pagoda was great ^^. Nice to see that is not just different, but is also pleasing. Just wondering, how does it look now that the bottom piece rotted away?

On the "artistic limitations" i guess the bonsai artist, like the proverb, "cannot change the wind, but can adjust the sails", so could we also call it "artistic challenge"?

By the way, I'm new in this forum so I guess I should also greet - hello everyone :)


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 Post subject: Rotting Wood
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:14 am 
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Location: Nashville.TN
Pehaps a fungicidal drench with Captan or Mancozeb would help with the rotting. Rotting is a very general term; could be fungal or just water exposure. In the case of water being the sole culprit, perhaps sealing the underside of the tree non-essential for roots would be an idea along with a more free-draining media. Baldcypress and pondcypress are incredibly water and drought tolerant as most riparaian plants are. Maybe reducing the watering rate to the underside and misting the foliage could be better in the future.
I am inspired by the composition. Miamitropicalbonsai.com has some incredible baldcypress as well as a Crepe-myrtle (Lagerstromia indica) in their specimen section that could be used for a similar effect without using stones. It's unfortunate to hear that the tree had some rotting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:24 pm 
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Location: Michigan USA
Welcome to the forum Vicen, it is a pleasure to see you here.
Owen, welcome to the editorial staff!

Will


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 12:45 pm
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Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
Quote:
To improve the landscape depicted by this tree, VanLandingham should consider placing the right side of the trunk closer to the viewer and the left side further back. This would create a sense of depth in the display, in which the pond is directly in front of the viewer, and the mountain is somewhat to the rear, which would furnish the design with compositional integrity.

Charles' suggestion is worth considering to create a better depth/compostion of the landscape. But with the lower part 'rotting' it is difficult to assume how the present scene would look like. Perhaps, a current picture can be of much help for further 'critique' on this unusual landscape.
Shaukat


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