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 Post subject: The Role of the Stand
PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2005 2:28 am 
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This thread is for discussing Attila Soos' article, "The Role of the Stand."
http://www.artofbonsai.org/feature_arti ... estand.php


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2005 9:38 am 
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Great article, Attila.

You've done a service to bonsai art with this one.

My compliments on the illustrations, too.

Kind regards,

Andy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 6:34 am 
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Like you said, it depends on the display as a whole. I see 2 displays:
In a stand-alone bonsai/stand display, the bonsai must be put on-centre because the bonsai itself is already in balance (tree and pot)

In a 3-point display , it maybe preferable to creates an unbalanced system of stand and bonsai, in order to meet the ?requesting moods? of the other 2 objects.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 10:54 am 
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Ron Sudiono wrote:
Like you said, it depends on the display as a whole. I see 2 displays:
In a stand-alone bonsai/stand display, the bonsai must be put on-centre because the bonsai itself is already in balance (tree and pot)
In a 3-point display , it maybe preferable to creates an unbalanced system of stand and bonsai, in order to meet the ?requesting moods? of the other 2 objects.


Ron,

I think it's critical to distinguish between balance and movement or flow.

The requesting moods of the other two objects (I like that expression!) may require movement or flow on the part of the tree/pot/stand combination; they are unlikely to require imbalance.

Best wishes,

Carl


Last edited by Carl Bergstrom on Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 2:07 pm 
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The whole system is always in balance, I think. In other words: the total picture of the 3 objects shows a balanced, often a rounded scenery. Yes, the individual object(s) may show, or even preferable to show a strong movement like a slant, but this slant will always be answered by the other object, neutralized so to speak, so that the total display can give us a complete, closed and peacefull image, maybe because our eyes can move around and around without effort.

But maybe I'm wrong and there are good displays with a strong movement as a whole which doesn't end where it begins, instead almost drilling the ceiling or one of the side walls.


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 Post subject: Different kinds of bonsai display
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 11:20 am 
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Very good article Attila. I just feel to add a little to the subject, that I find interesting.
There are tree forms of bonsai display styles. They are named shin, gyo and so.
Shin is a very formal style, and in this case the scroll always is settled precisely in the centre of a Tokonoma.

Gyo is less formal and allows the scroll to be placed slightly off centre. This influences at the bonsai style and accents chosen, that also must be slightly informal in their style.

The free style called so lets the artist play around more freely with the elements. So allows the scroll to be placed much more off centre, and the usage of more artistic pots i.e. are also in the slipstream of the free form.

Furthermore, just to make it more complex, the different forms of display can be toned and mixed. And the interpretation of the chosen style can differ from the artists. The point to take is that one has to be open minded to the expressions of the whole composition.

The main focus is the feeling of the display. The untold and understated elements are the key to feel the display.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 1:36 pm 
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Thanks guys for the comments.

And Morten, your addition to the subject is very useful. Thank you for doing that. I would love to see some studies on the three different styles you've mentioned. Too bad there is not much published in English on this matter (except Willie's book), but that's one of the reason I am working on my Japanese language skills these days.

Regards,

Attila


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 Post subject: Photo examples
PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 3:12 am 
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Hi Attila
Here are some examples. I have published an article at
www.shohin-europe.com with some extra text as well.
Image
SHIN
Shohin-Bonsai, Juniperus Shimpaku, in a formal set-up, (shin).
Display by Daizo Iwasaki, Japan.
Photo: Morten Albek
Image
GYO
Here the scroll is placed slightly off centre, and together with the figurine the less formal style (gyo) is expressed.
Shohin-Bonsai at the Gafuten 30 in Japan. Winter display.
Photo: Higuchi Takeshi
Image
So
300 year old Pine displayed by Saburo Kato, Japan.
Photo: Morten Albek
Image
In this example, a mix between the formal (shin) and the less formal (gyo) style is used. The scroll is placed in the centre, but there is added a modern pot to the image, that
makes this set-up more informal in style.
Tokonoma, summer display at the home of Daizo Iwasaki, Japan.
Photo: Morten Albek
Image
Summer display by Hiroshi Takeyama. Display without scroll is also a common practise.
Especially when the mood and time of year easily is suggested by the bonsai and the accent.
Photo: Morten Albek
Remember that the final expression and interpretation is related far more to feelings of the display than following rules.
Kind regards, Morten Albek


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 11:35 am 
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Great post, Morten! Thanks so much for presenting that here.

The photographs help a lot to solidify the concepts that you discussed in your previous comments.

Again, much appreciated!

Best regards,

Carl


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 11:59 am 
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Morten,

What I really like about your photos is that they show examples of how much variety can be achieved within these displays. There may be a misconception amongst us Westerners that those Japanese displays are very rigid and they all look the same.

As you've demonstrated here, there is much more room for creativity than we may assume.

Thank you,

Attila


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