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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:36 am 
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Thank you John. I play bass, guitar and (once in a blue moon) drums, by the way. I have been learing a lot in my club, from books and websites like this. I'm just starting to learn some Botany and I think that will be a huge help for me. For 12 years I played bass by ear with little training, then a buddy turned me on to a book named "The Bass Grimoire" which showed not just scales, but modes and how they were derived and related, then everything clicked for me and I got significantly better in a matter of weeks. I'm hoping to not wait 12 years for the same improvement in Bonsai. (I believe they also make a guitar grimoire book, and I've heard it's good, you may want to see if you can find it)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:54 am 
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Location: Southwest Florida,US
Dan,welcome to the forum.
Enjoy the art of creating little great trees!(Btw,I like more modern
classical guitar,especially Segovia !!)
Regards,
dorothy schmitz,florida


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 12:05 pm 
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Dan Cormican wrote:
Thank you John. I play bass, guitar and (once in a blue moon) drums, by the way. I have been learing a lot in my club, from books and websites like this. I'm just starting to learn some Botany and I think that will be a huge help for me. For 12 years I played bass by ear with little training, then a buddy turned me on to a book named "The Bass Grimoire" which showed not just scales, but modes and how they were derived and related, then everything clicked for me and I got significantly better in a matter of weeks. I'm hoping to not wait 12 years for the same improvement in Bonsai. (I believe they also make a guitar grimoire book, and I've heard it's good, you may want to see if you can find it)

You're not the Bowflex guy are you? Just kidding.
Thanks for the tip on guitar grimoire. I'll keep an eye out for it.
Galilean Satellites? Cary?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 1:44 pm 
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Location: Michigan USA
I wonder how many artists can admit they are blind when observing their own bonsai but have perfect 20/20 vision when observing others?

Will


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 1:47 pm 
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Will Heath wrote:
I wonder how many artists can admit they are blind when observing their own bonsai but have perfect 20/20 vision when observing others?

Will

A fairly common affliction! I'm sure we're all guilty to some degree.
Mike


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 3:34 pm 
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i would have to admit to feeling blind in both cases. but that's what we're all here is to learn from one another and improve not only our eye sight of others trees but our own as well. I would like to extend thanks to everyone who puts them selves out there and makes the knowledge we need to better hone our skills available to those of us who seek it.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 3:59 pm 
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Will Heath wrote:
I wonder how many artists can admit they are blind when observing their own bonsai but have perfect 20/20 vision when observing others?

Will

I believe it is not only common, but I also believe it is an affliction. That's why I made the anorexia analogy. I believe we have a picture in our minds eye that is so set on the way the tree should look that we don't see the reality of what is in front of us. That's why taking pictures and reviewing them often, will help you. Pictures don't lie, you will quickly see from the picture that your tree is not as good as you thought it was.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:03 am 
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Location: Michigan USA
I would expect that many cases of blindness might be diagnosed, if not cured in the current contest.
A contest that specifically requests world-class trees will get many entries that are and no doubt a few that are not, a few that only the final scores will reveal the true nature of to the blind in one eye participants.

Will


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2007 9:10 am 
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No doubt, but still the issue of an individual's ability to look at his/her's own material objectively is still a problem.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 9:43 am 
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Vance Wood wrote:
No doubt, but still the issue of an individual's ability to look at his/her's own material objectively is still a problem.
Maybe the term elite should apply to those who enlighten others, I personally have learned from reading this thread many thanks Brian


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 Post subject: Re: Blind In One Eye
PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 6:28 pm 
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Location: Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
Quote:
Vance Wood:

I believe we have a picture in our minds eye that is so set on the way the tree should look that we don't see the reality of what is in front of us.


This reminded me of a trick I sometimes use when I feel a drawing needs to be improved. I look at my drawing in the mirror. The mirrored image is reversed, and I find it much easier to see where improvements should be made. I guess its a way of fooling your minds eye.

I wonder if this could be applied to bonsai?


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 Post subject: Re: Blind In One Eye
PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2009 7:02 am 
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Jonathan Heckbert wrote:
Quote:
Vance Wood:

I believe we have a picture in our minds eye that is so set on the way the tree should look that we don't see the reality of what is in front of us.


This reminded me of a trick I sometimes use when I feel a drawing needs to be improved. I look at my drawing in the mirror. The mirrored image is reversed, and I find it much easier to see where improvements should be made. I guess its a way of fooling your minds eye.

I wonder if this could be applied to bonsai?


Yes, I believe it can. I have found that with the advent of digital photography and not having to concern yourself with the cost of developing that a couple of photos will show you what your eye refuses to see. It is especially effective when shot against a back lite environment. This exposure will show you a multitude of sins so to speak.


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